Terry Laszlo-Gopadze
Terry's Bio

“EMBRACE YOUR INNER WILD: 52 REFLECTIONS FOR AN ECO-CENTRIC WORLD”

July 14th, 2011

Mary Reynolds ThompsonThis is the title of an up and coming book by an inspiring woman, Mary Reynolds Thompson.  Mary invites us to connect with earth’s spirit and wisdom in fresh and meaningful ways. She calls us to renew our relationship to earth while we make commitments to heal the natural world and ourselves.  I had to introduce you to Mary. Mary is calling us home.

I wanted to share Mary’s wonderful newsletter with you as well.  I’m signing up! Join me.
Click Here

www.reclaimingthewildsoul.com

With gratitude and reverence for our planet,

Terry

 

Unexpected Blessings

June 16th, 2011

“Of a certainty
the man who can see
all creatures in himself,
Himself in all creatures,
knows no sorrow.”

-EESHA UPANISHAD

Spring is a season of many delights.  Including the creatures who appear in our yards and the feast of flowers in full splendor.  I’ve seen red fox, quail, coyotes, hawks, raccoons, hummingbirds, and most recently two doves came to nest in our rose bush. I wake up in the morning to cooing.  I also met a rattlesnake.

As I was stepping into the yard a few days ago a young rattlesnake was less than a foot away from my foot! I backed away and watched this small snake and tried not to be afraid of it. I wanted to bond with this messenger (as I believe all the animals that come to us are messengers).  I searched for the shamanic meaning of snake to find they symbolize rebirth, renewal, transformation, wisdom, healing, and primitive energy.  I told my husband if the snake would have bitten me, I could have died and then been reborn, renewed, transformed and healed!  But seriously, I knew intuitively that there was a message for me. Like the snake, I need to shed some things in my nature and some relationships that really aren’t working for me at this point. I also needed to trust that the beautiful qualities snake was bringing to me were moving into my life.

When the two doves decided to build their nest above our barbecue, my husband and I decided that we would give up the barbecue so that they could have a smoke free environment.  Everyday we look to see if they are still in their nest and safe.

Doves symbolically remind of the importance of peace. Deep peace. The kind of peace that helps to calm our worries and our troubled thoughts. They remind us to renew in silence.  In our moments of stillness are able to find and appreciate the simple blessings.  Doves represent the ability to see new possibilities.

As the doves arrived and built their nest, I received this wonderful little story from my friend Jacque Rice Jensen.  I had to share it.

 

SPRING …….. LOVE OUT ON A LIMB

The things that go on in the tree right outside my bedroom window never cease to amaze me.  A few days ago the antics of two young doves diverted my attention for a few moments.  Sharing one small limb, they were a “couple”, or perhaps they were about to become one. Sitting rather sedately, side by side, he reached over to give her an adoring peck. She radiated pleasure.  Then without warning he grabbed her beak into his, swung her off the limb and onto the side he’d been perched on! He then attempted to jump onto her back, a movement that caused him to lose what little grip he had on the situation. Sputtering and fluttering he fell off, barely catching the limb with his toes!

She however, had maintained total calmness throughout, landing gracefully, with barely a feather out of place! Though she did give him a small look of bewilderment, as if to say, “What were you thinking, Dovie?”

When last I looked, they were still sitting side by side like an old married couple, appearing content with what was, while around them all the other birds with no demonstrations of judgment continued their joyous hymns to spring.

Are there any qualities of the snake or dove that you can would like in your life? Then take a moment to reflect or meditate on each quality and what action you can take to call them in.

rebirth
transformation
renewal
primitive energy
wisdom
stillness
calmness
new possibilities
shedding

Like St. Francis said, “You are that which you are seeking.”

May your path be blessed,

Terry

 

Why I’m Filled with Gratitude……

May 18th, 2011

Nautilus Silver AwardThe Spirit of a Woman won a Silver Nautilus Book Award! My heart opens every time I think of it.  I’m grateful for all the people who supported me along the way when this book was just a seed and yet they encouraged me, helped me, and kept me inspired when the road was difficult and I lost my way.  This reminds me to do the same, to nurture people who come to me with their dreams. To give them what I can, for we are all a community of gifted, talented and creative people and I want to pass on all that I have been blessed with. I share this award with the contributors of the book and my tribe.  Like Dr. Glady’s McGarey says, “We need each other.” Each of us are miracles.

Nautilus Book Awards recognize books that promote spiritual growth, conscious living, and positive social change, offering the readers “new possibilities” for a better life and a better world.

Winners are carefully selected in a unique three-tier judging process by experienced teams of book reviewers, editors, authors, librarians, bookstore owners, and leaders in the publishing industry. Previous winners include Deepak Chopra MD, the Dalai Lama, Eckart Tolle, Huston Smith, Marianne Williamson, and Andrew Weil, MD.

http://www.nautilusbookawards.com/ The Spirit of a Woman is in the Women’s Interests Silver Awards category.

With celebration and gratitude,

Terry

Promises Kept

May 10th, 2011

By Deborah L. Staunton

Each of us is here to discover our true Self,,,
that essentially we are spiritual beings
who have taken manifestation in physical form,,,
that we’re not human beings that have occasional spiritual experiences,,,
that we’re spiritual beings that have occasional human experiences.

-Deepak Chopra

Somewhere in the far reaches of my mind I hear her calling. Coming instantly out of an already light sleep, I am awake, alert, lucid. In soft cotton socks like cat’s paws, I make my way down the stairs and through the darkened kitchen to the doorway of her room. The thudding of my heart seems strong and powerful enough to sustain us both.

The buglight, mounted just outside her window, throws a beam of harsh yellow light across her bed, coloring the room in illness.  It silhouettes the high cheekbones of her thin, wrinkled face, draining away any trace of animation that might have been there.  She lies motionless on her back, eyes closed, face tilted upward toward heaven… or maybe the ceiling. This unnatural state of inertia has shrouded her sleep for many months.  Standing in the stillness, I search for the courage to move closer.  Not tonight, please not tonight.

As I lean down to listen for a breath and to watch for the rise of her chest, my own breath is cut short in a fear-induced synchronicity with hers.  I’m here Gram, I heard you, I’m here.  And then, cutting into the silence, a sharp intake of air, the rise and fall of her chest, and she gives me back my breath, deep inhalations of relief. Thank you, Gram.  Thank you for breathing and for giving me one more day to make amends.

Pulling a chair over, I sit by her head and stroke her hair.  How easy it is to be kind in the darkness where our demons lurk to remind us of the evil we ignore in the brilliance of the morning sun.  There is no escape from this dance of cruelty I do. With every spoon I bring to her lips, with every trip to the bathroom, every adjusted pillow or change in position, I am a little less gentle, a little less caring, a little more angry, a little more weary.  I dance on in a frenzied song of resentment, building to a crescendo of guilt until finally, the sun begins to set and all is quiet again.

As I sit here by her frail, sleeping form, I long to crawl in under the covers and curl up next to her like I did as a child.  But my child-self will not find what she is looking for.  She will find, instead, adult anger and the shadow of something left behind.

It’s so hot.  My nightgown clings to my damp body.  I can’t breathe.  I try but I am suddenly racked with a deep, raspy, uncontrollable cough.  From somewhere in the darkness I hear her voice.

“It’s okay darling, cough it up. I’ll stay with you. I’ll stay right here.” I am nine years old, she’s close and I’m safe.  Then suddenly the coughing begins again and my adult self reaches out to comfort her in a painful role reversal.  Where did you go Gram? She forgot my name today as she spoke of those from sixty years ago. The pictures in her mind are sharp, clear, and alive with color as she recalls a young girl on a long-ago voyage bravely stepping into a new and foreign land.  Seven siblings wait patiently in Europe for the time when they too can take that journey.  A younger brother and sister join her in America, as five others, seven nieces and nephews, and both parents are sent to Auschwitz.  There are four survivors.  And as they arrive, one by one, the indelible marks of Hitler’s camps are etched as deeply and permanently in her heart as they are on the delicate flesh of her sister’s arms.

I am enraptured as much by her voice as by the story it brings forth.  At twelve I could hardly wait for winter break and the chance to hear that voice again. Rushing into her six-story Bronx building, I welcomed the familiar clang of apartment doors as their echoes rang out in the empty corridors.  Curled in a chair in a corner of her small, safe kitchen, reflections of my girlhood spilling forth, I shared all my secrets and then begged for hers.

What are you secrets now, Gram? The pictures in my mind are clear and vibrant too, memories rich in color as the fuzzy blacks and whites of today slowly fade into washed out shades of grey.  Was it just last night that she called out in her sleep?  Last week?  Two hours ago?  Two months?   My spirit aches with the pain of her disease while hers remains bright and strong in spite of it.

She had an extraordinary way of instilling confidence at my most vulnerable times.  At nine, a metal cart stuffed with groceries between us, I walked with her toward the tiny concession stand she ran in the middle of an enormous golf course.  The open expanse of land provided no protection from the oppressive city heat or the golf balls that flew across the sky without warning.  My fear of being hit with one nearly paralyzed me until the steady, familiar rhythm of her voice assured me that she wouldn’t allow it to happen.  An instant later the wind shifted and a small white blur flew past my ear and landed in the basket just inches away.  Adrenaline pumping and heart pounding, I was indignant.  “See Gram.  I told you!  I told you!”  She turned slowly to face me and putting her hand gently on my shoulder, she asked, “Did I let it hit you?”

Standing, I bend down to kiss the top of her head.

“Goodnight Gram,” I whisper, “See you in the morning.”

The words lie heavy on my tongue, resonating with the nakedness of the plea behind them.  As I turn to go, she reaches for my hand in the darkness.

Looking up at me through eyes that have seen and endured so much, she says, “It’s not good to be sick.  Get married soon so I can come to your wedding.”

“I will Gram, I will.”

As I utter the now familiar promise, a new and overwhelming significance embodies my words.  A keen awareness of her need to be a part of this milestone shades the exchange with an unnatural sense of power.  If I hold out on my promise, she’ll hold out on hers.  As mind and body deteriorate, we continue to make promises and each day we struggle separately to keep them.  When someone dies, we are told so often that it is okay to be angry and it’s okay to feel sad, yet we rarely hear those words when the person we are mourning is still alive.

Returning to the room above hers, I fall into another light sleep.  In this dream state, she comes to me.  I hear her in the hallway, and there she is at the top of the stairs on strong and sturdy legs. Her cheeks are plump and flushed with color and I am eager to unravel my thoughts on her like balls of yarn from a basket.  We speak together with voices as unused as the legs she now stands on.  The rightness of the situation, the certainty that we have achieved clarity in the midst of a haze, reminds us of who we are.  We have returned to each other.  Like an unfocused photograph, the clarity begins to fade as morning arrives and the day takes on the fuzzy edges of reality.

Making my way to her room with knots of tension forming in my shoulders, I am relieved to see her awake and animated, last night’s events temporarily forgotten in favor of the morning ritual over toast an coffee.

“Take me to the table, Darling. I want to tell you something while we eat.”

“Okay, Gram.  Let’s get you into your chair first.  Hold my arm.  It’s O.K.; I’ve got you.  There, that’s right.  Now let’s brush your hair.”

“Take me to the table now, O.K. Honey?”

“Yes, Gram we’re on our way.”

“Last night I had a wonderful dream,” she says, “I was walking and I went upstairs.  We had a nice talk.  It was good to walk again.”

I look up from my paper, meeting her eyes with my own, “I had that dream too, Gram.”

I held my breath and prayed a lot but I knew she was slipping away.  And I knew that I could no longer be what she needed nor could I be there when she went. She knew it too, so she waited until I left before she passed away.  She would not be at my wedding and I would not marry soon enough for her.  Broken promises, like jagged shards of glass, cut into me with the searing pain of injustice.

In dreams, our souls beckon each other, forming a bridge that illuminates the unspoken promises of our continued journey together in the spiritual realm.

It’s been nearly five years.  I am not yet married but I continue to keep my promise.  And she continues to keep hers.  We walk together at night.

Deborah and Gram

Deborah L Staunton holds a B.S. in Early Childhood Education, a B.A. in Theatre Arts and postgraduate credits in Creative Writing.  She has pursued her passion for theatre, specifically, stage management and lighting design in New York, Virginia & Pennsylvania and has published articles in Stage Directions, The Sondheim Review, and Amateur Stage as well as contributing theatre reviews to a website called MyLeisureTime.com. She has also utilized her background in infant development by re-writing the child development materials for Harcourt Learning Direct and has published articles in Writers’ Journal and The Acorn.  Promises Kept has won Honorable Mention in the EL Dorado Writer’s Guild writing contest and First Place for memoir in the Fiction Writer’s Journey. Deborah is working on a book-length memoir about her journey to become a mother after four miscarriages and has plans for a second one about her daughter’s special needs.  She resides on Long Island with her husband Dominic and their children Sophie, six and Sam fourteen months.

Spirited Woman Top 12 Mother’s Day Picks

May 3rd, 2011
Uplifting words expand your heart. Our Mother’s Day Top 12 Book Pick List is filled with inspirational books that are ideal gifts for your mother or yourself. Enjoy this special day together – and share a heartfelt book! Save this list all year round! A great book resource for you.

Read Spirited Woman’s Top 12 Mother’s Day Picks Here >

 

 

Green Valley Spa in Utah

April 25th, 2011

Green Valley SpaPresenting Creating Your Destiny, Terry Laszlo-Gopadze, editor of The Spirit of a Woman: Stories to Empower and Inspire, will share stories from the book that speak to the importance of following our great dreams and callings.  Terry will describe the ways in which stories can help us to engage in lives of deeper meaning, purpose and creative fire. She will also share how our longings guide us to where we belong. As we claim the future, we also stand up and take our place in the world.  Each of us has a great destiny.  What will yours be?

TerryGreen Valley Spa in Utah
Thursday May 5th at 7pm

www.GreenValleySpa.com

 



 

 

 

Creating a Vision for Our Future

April 7th, 2011

Jyoti“…we have reached a moment of humility and if we have the courage to embrace it, we will dream a new dream for our children and our grand children. If we cannot step out of our egos and into the heart of our Spirit, then we will continue to invest in the ways that are threatening the very health of the planet and her inhabitants.”

-Jyoti

I met Jyoti  (a Hindu name that means light) at a peace conference.  She was speaking at the conference with a few of The Thirteen Indigenous Grandmothers. www.grandmotherscouncil.org

Over the years, I have been able to get to know Jyoti. I can tell you that I don’t know anyone who is more dedicated to preserving the ancient ways of The Indigenous People and our dear planet. She does this from a place of love, deep sacrifice and commitment.   She does this even when she is going through great challenges in her own life.  She keeps showing up and creating a world that is better for everyone. www.forthenext7generations.com

When she first brought The Thirteen Indigenous Grandmothers together (from countries all over the world) her vision was to preserve the plant medicine by learning from and working with these wise elders. However, they have formed an inspiring council for peace, prayer and healing. I am honored to have her story entitled “Prayer in Action” in The Spirit of a Woman. You can read an excerpt from her story here.

When I received this profound newsletter, from Jyoti’s Center for Sacred Studies, I wanted to pass it on to you so you can share in the amazing events that they provide and be encouraged by what they are doing.

TerryMay you walk in beauty,
Terry

Read Jyoti’s Newsletter Here.
Read Jyoti’s Bio Here.

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Women’s History Month

March 29th, 2011

Janet Riehl“When women work together nothing is impossible.”

-Susan B. Anthony

One of the most fulfilling experiences of my life has been working with, and getting to know, the contributors in The Spirit of a Woman. They have enriched and deeply expanded my life and the lives of other women, leading us all to new places.

Janet Grace Riehl is one of those contributors, and she has generously helped me get the messages in The Spirit of a Woman out in to the world. It has been difficult at times, as our callings sometimes are, but I can always count on Janet to share her wisdom and experience with me. I also enjoy her enthusiasm and rich creativity.

Recently, I was as happily surprised when I read her essay about being a contributor in The Spirit of a Woman. Janet’s post “Life Takes Time. So Do Books”, is the first in the Womens Memoirs’ (www.womensmemoirs.com.) Wednesday series by authors talking about how the books they’ve written changed them. Kendra Bonnett and Matilda Butler are celebrating Women’s History Month on their site and I thought you might enjoy it, and think about giving your own books and stories the time they need to come to light, and life.

Read Janet’s essay here: http://womensmemoirs.com/memoir-book-reviews/life-takes-time-so-do-books-by-janet-grace-riehl/

Peace and Harmony,

Terry

——-

Read Janet’s Bio – Click Here

Janet’s, Sliding Glass Door, is a beautiful story about the importance of friendship and history in the Changes and Choices chapter in The Spirit of a Woman.  Visit Janet at www.Riehlife.com

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

IWWG Big Apple Conference

March 9th, 2011

The International Women’s Writing Guild

Presents its 61st

BIG APPLE CONFERENCE

Saturday, April 16, 2011 “Memoir and Metaphor:  Illuminating Your Life through Writing”

Sunday, April 17, 2011
 Meet the Authors (Terry Laszlo-Gopadze is on this

Panel) Meet the Agents

National Arts Club
15 Gramercy Park South (just East of East 20th Street)
New York City

 

 

 

Women’s History Month

March 9th, 2011

The Spirit of a Woman: Stories to Empower and Inspire

7 p.m. March 23rd, Women’s History Month
Schlafly Library

St. Louis, MO
Left Bank Books will sell books.

Alice Butler Collins and Janet Grace Riehl lead a women’s empowerment event during Women’s History Month. We’ll share our stories in the anthology and engage the audience is remembering their own stories.

Alice Butler Collins (of Chicago) website: www.alicebutlercollins.com

Janet Grace Riehl’s (of St. Louis) website: www.riehlife.com

Here’s the link on Amazon:

http://www.amazon.com/Spirit-Woman-Stories-Empower-Inspire/dp/1595800522

 

 

 

 

The IWWG California Conference

March 9th, 2011
The International Women’s Writing Guild
presents
The California Conference:
The Alchemy of Language: Turning Simple Words into Shimmering Works

Friday, March 18 to Sunday, March 20, 2011

Bosch Bahái School, 500 Comstock Lane, Santa Cruz, California

Setting: The California Conference, in its 28th year, takes place at Bosch Bahai School, a 67 acre retreat center situated in the Santa Cruz Mountains among the Redwood Trees.

Program: How do we transform our simple thoughts into works that will transfix the reader? Can we become borrowers, using the information and form the great masters; nature’s images, and our own poetic lines? The alchemy of language stems from being open to inspiration wherever we find it. Come join us in finding robust nouns, verbs, adjectives, and adverbs to make our writing shimmer.

WORKSHOPS:

Imitation to Originality – Modeling Our Work on the Masters’: Richelle McClain

Nature as Thesaurus – Culling Vibrant Images from the Pages of Nature: Mary Reynolds Thompson

Poetry as Springboard – Start with a Poem; Finish with a Flourish: Rachel de Baere

Workshop Directors:

Richelle McClain, Mary Reynolds Thoompson, and Rachel de Baere (see website for bios)

Conference Fees:

Members:

  • Weekend guests inclusive of entire program, two nights room and all meals: $375
  • Weekend commuters inclusive of program, exclusive of room and meals: $160
  • Day attendees – Saturday Only: $125
  • Day attendees – Sunday Only: $55

Non-Members:

  • Weekend guests inclusive of entire program, two nights room and all meals: $395
  • Weekend commuters inclusive of program, exclusive of room and meals: $180
  • Day attendees – Saturday Only: $150
  • Day attendees – Sunday Only – $70

 

Registration Deposit (will be applied to the registration fee): $60

Meals: Breakfast ($9), Lunch ($12), Dinner ($13)

IWWG Annual Membership: $55
Payment: Payment may be made by credit card at www.iwwg.org. Click on Events/Calandar. Or send a check made out to IWWG and mail it to: IWWG, P.O. Box 810, New York, NY  10028.

Regional IWWG Representatives:

Northern California: Rachel de Baere (415) 456-4574, itsmerach@comcast.net
IWWG Headquarters: Hannelore Hahn (212) 737-7536, dirhahn@aol.com

 

 

 

Challenge and Transformation: Tapping into the Healing Power of Story – Rancho La Puerta

March 8th, 2011

Sheri Ritchlin and Terry Laszlo-GopadzeWith Terry Laszlo-Gopadze and Sheri Ritchlin

May 19 – May 26, 2012
Rancho La Puerta
Tecate, Mexico

Terry Laszlo-Gopadze, editor of The Spirit of a Women: Stories to Empower and Inspire, and editor/contributor Sheri will share stories from the book and consider the ways in which such personal narratives can heal, especially through clarifying and strengthening the sense of self and purpose.  The workshop series will bring participants together in a circle to conceive, compose, and tell their stories, offering techniques for transforming energies of crisis and suffering into a rich and meaningful narrative. Every story has a gift. What will yours be?  In the final session, we will carry those stories in a quiet sharing through a labyrinth walk in the Ranch oak grove.

Rancho La Puerta

www.rancholapuerta.com

 

 

 

 

 

 

A Remarkable Woman and a Tender Story

February 17th, 2011

Meeting Lena Rivkin, was a great way to start 2011. I felt grateful that we were in the beautiful embrace of Rancho La Puerta http://www.rancholapuerta.com/ where nature, nurture, organic food and delightful hikes abound and the interesting people that I meet there make it special.

I met Lena (a graphologist and artist) when I attended her wonderfully fun and revealing classes at the ranch. She can analyze you by your hand-writing! To learn more go to Abouthandwriting.com

I was immediately struck by Lena’s bright smile, humility and her genuine interest in others when I attended her class. I found her to be extremely articulate and talented.  Her analysis of the handwritings of the participants were startlingly accurate.

When Lena analyzed my handwriting she said, “Yes, I see you have a literary aptitude. Do you write at all?”  She was certainly correct. I told her I had a book published in June. When she mentioned my attention to detail, I knew she saw my “perfectionistic tendencies” and was being respectful!

Over lunch, I learned that Lena’s older brother has autism.  Lena is his guardian angel.  And so the bigger story unfolds about a sister who is loving, devoted and understanding to a brother whose limits have actually changed her into a deeper more compassionate person. You can read their story here http://blog.autismspeaks.org/2010/05/26/itow-rivkin/

They create artwork together.  Isn’t this interesting, beautiful and amazing?

Lena shared this note with me that she sent to the media. I was not aware at that time of this proposed budget cut. I wanted to share it with you too.

Re: Proposed Medi-Cal Cutbacks

“As siblings of developmentally disabled adults currently living in a group home, we are frightened and saddened by the Governor’s proposed reductions in Medi-Cal funding. These cutbacks would jeopardize the existence of their home and destroy the safe world that has been created for them. While we recognize that cuts have to be made, and regret that so many deserving people will be effected, it is unconscionable that this proposed budget would undermine the well being of the most vulnerable and helpless amongst us.”

As Franklin Roosevelt said,  ‘Society will be judged by how it treats its weakest members.’

Regards,
Stu Silverman & Lena Rivkin

To learn more, or to help go to www.newhorizons.org

Lets keep Lena’s and Phillip’s story in our hearts and minds as we go through the changes in our state.

Big Love,
Terry

The Alchemy of Language: Turning Simple Words into Shimmering Works

February 10th, 2011

Invitation,

I’d like to invite you to the Big Apple Conference in New York!   I’ll be attending the conference on Saturday to take the class on Memoir and Metaphor: Illuminating Your Life Through Writing.

Every story has a gift! I wonder what yours will tell? I wonder what I’ll discover about one of my own? I’m so thrilled to have this time to explore and nurture a story while meeting other writers and I wanted to share this conference with you.

On Sunday, I’ll be on the author panel talking about “The Spirit of a Woman” and the publishing process. If any of you are attending, please say hello!

If you go to the California conference, let me know how it goes!

With joy,

Terry

———–

The International Women’s Writing Guild presents The California Conference:

The Alchemy of Language: Turning Simple Words into Shimmering Works

Friday, March 18 to Sunday, March 20, 2011

Bosch Bahái School, 500 Comstock Lane, Santa Cruz, California

Setting: The California Conference, in its 28th year, takes place at Bosch Bahai School, a 67 acre retreat center situated in the Santa Cruz Mountains among the Redwood Trees.

Program: How do we transform our simple thoughts into works that will transfix the reader? Can we become borrowers, using the information and form the great masters; nature’s images, and our own poetic lines? The alchemy of language stems from being open to inspiration wherever we find it. Come join us in finding robust nouns, verbs, adjectives, and adverbs to make our writing shimmer.

WORKSHOPS:

Imitation to Originality – Modeling Our Work on the Masters’: Richelle McClain

Nature as Thesaurus – Culling Vibrant Images from the Pages of Nature: Mary Reynolds Thompson

Poetry as Springboard – Start with a Poem; Finish with a Flourish: Rachel de Baere

Workshop Directors:

Richelle McClain, Mary Reynolds Thoompson, and Rachel de Baere (see website for bios)

Conference Fees:

Members:

  • Weekend guests inclusive of entire program, two nights room and all meals: $375
  • Weekend commuters inclusive of program, exclusive of room and meals: $160
  • Day attendees – Saturday Only: $125
  • Day attendees – Sunday Only: $55

Non-Members:

  • Weekend guests inclusive of entire program, two nights room and all meals: $395
  • Weekend commuters inclusive of program, exclusive of room and meals: $180
  • Day attendees – Saturday Only: $150
  • Day attendees – Sunday Only – $70

Registration Deposit (will be applied to the registration fee): $60

Meals: Breakfast ($9), Lunch ($12), Dinner ($13)

IWWG Annual Membership: $55

Payment: Payment may be made by credit card at www.iwwg.org. Click on Events/Calandar. Or send a check made out to IWWG and mail it to: IWWG, P.O. Box 810, New York, NY  10028.

Regional IWWG Representatives:

Northern California: Rachel de Baere (415) 456-4574, itsmerach@comcast.net

IWWG Headquarters: Hannelore Hahn (212) 737-7536, dirhahn@aol.com

Author Exposure: Audio Review of The Spirit of a Woman

January 28th, 2011

Listen Here

The Spirit of a Woman Available at:
Amazon
Barnes & Noble



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